Better Service: The Innovation People Actually Want

I listened to a podcast the other day where the host said that people in Silicon Valley have begun to roll their eyes when they hear the word “innovation”. I’m not surprised. The pace at which new tools, systems and ideas are emerging is a little overwhelming, as is the pressure to claim that what you are doing is “innovative”.  Yet for all their unique bells and whistles, there’s one thing all IT solutions have in common: they create new and exciting ways for people like me to feel old.

As someone who simultaneously holds credentials as a techie and a laggard, I can sympathize with both sides. Progress is awesome, but change is hard.  You can see astute businesses trying to accommodate this contradiction. Atlassian is quick to point out the limits of trying to work collaboratively via email:

Yet they recognize that many customers prefer “the comfort of their email inboxes”  and created a way to raise a JIRA Service Desk request via email. Email is a prominent example of a once innovative, and now legacy, technology that refuses to die.  In fact in their recent recently released 2017 State of Enterprise Collaborationthe makers of SmartSheet noted that in spite of widespread use of Cloud collaboration tools, email use is actually on the rise.   
 

Paradoxically, the persistent of “legacy” systems like email bode well for the expansion of the service desk model to business teams beyond IT.  Software systems ease our nerves and offer comfort to even the most entrenched laggards by metaphorically mimicking processes we are already familiar with.  Although email has no element that corresponds with an envelope, a picture of an envelope appears on my screen as Hotmail loads my inbox.  I click on a drawing of scissors to remove phrases of this post from one place to another even though no blades are involved. Familiarity breeds comfort.

The introduction of help desk tickets by IT teams has therefore, paved the way for other business teams to handle request management via a service desk model.  Internal and external customers have become accustomed to going to a portal and submitting a ticket when they’re locked out of their software, have a problem with the printer or need to order new hardware. IT has provided the familiarity so customers won’t feel shock, confusion and resistance upon being sent to a portal to submit a request to HR, Finance or Marketing.  In fact, customers will appreciate the features a service desk offers: 

  • Easy approvals
  • Real-time status
  • End to end tracking
  • And most likely, better, faster service 

But can tools like JIRA Service Desk that were created for IT really work for other business teams? They can now. ThinkTilt has created ProForma to empower teams to build and deploy forms in JIRA Service Desk. No need to lump everything together in a description field or create a spaghetti plate of custom fields. Now any team can collect exactly the information they need on a JSD request. In fact, we’ve made the conversion to JIRA Service Desk even easier by building a library of forms and process templates for your teams to use. Email may be slow to die, but it isn’t the best way to do business.  Why not grant your business teams the functionality of JIRA?